New Baikal Dimensions team members

Our team was extraordinarily lucky to receive a large number of applications from terrific job candidates! Wow. Not only did they have great scientific credentials, but many of them spoke multiple languages and had broad international experience!

Kara Woo will be our new Information Manager for the project. She’ll be making sure that the diverse data being collected are easily shared, and responsibly archived, and helping us with logistics (such as managing the routine of getting the collaborators to make blog contributions!).  She is finishing her Bachelors degree at Brown University, and will join us in June 2012. She has already worked with diverse data management challenges as an undergraduate, and has been deeply immersed in learning Russian language and culture since she was 11 years old! It seems like she has been training for this specific position over the past 10 years!…

Derek Gray is a new Baikal Dimensions postdoc, working with me here at NCEAS. Derek did his Masters with Hugh MacIsaac, researching Lake Superior invasive species in ship ballast. I first met Derek on that project because he was working closely with my good friend Ian Duggan, who was a postdoc with Hugh at the time. (Ian and I met as grad students, and have long had a competition over numbers and citation rates of our papers… I am not going to say who’s winning right now!)   Derek went on to do his Ph.D. in Shelley Arnott‘s lab, looking at the roles of dispersal and environmental conditions in determining zooplankton community composition. I have frequently been mistaken as Shelley’s doppelganger, so hopefully Derek doesn’t find this too traumatizing.

Marianne just found out that Ted Ozersky accepted the Wellesley College postdoc position, and we are really excited to welcome him to the project. He has experience working on the North American Great Lakes, and speaks fluent Russian!

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4 Responses to New Baikal Dimensions team members

  1. lyampolsky says:

    I would also like to introduce to the Team a Masters’ student we have just admitted to our program, who will be a part of Baikal project: Larry Bowman. Larry graduated from Dartmouth College last year with a degree in Biological Sciences (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology concentration) and an English Literature Minor. Prior to joining Baikal team Larry has worked, as an undergraduate, in Dr Mary Lou Geurinot’s lab, working on molecular aspects of the relationship between Bradyrhizobium bacterium and soybeans. He also worked with Jim Carlton at the Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program where apparently got hooked up on aquatic creatures, further developing this interest as a participant in Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Ecology (travels to field stations all over Costa Rica and the Cayman Islands – let’s see how he likes the BK station!) Finally, he did his Senior project with Dr. Rebecca Irwin, studying invasive plant species in NH and CO. In Baikal project he will be working on population genetics and population ecology aspects of Daphnia invading Baikal main body.

    • sehampton says:

      This is a lot of Dartmouth connections! Marianne and I both did our PhDs at Dartmouth, and Derek’s MS advisor did his PhD at Dartmouth as well!…

      • llbowmanjr says:

        ‘Round the girdled earth they roam…
        I look forward to joining everyone on this amazing project. When I was asking for recommendations, several of my professors said, “Look up Stephanie Hampton. She’s doing great things on Baikal.” And, what do you know…!

  2. Pingback: Origins! How Baikal collaboration began for this zooplankton ecologist… | Lake Baikal Dimensions of Biodiversity

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